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  • Adult Only - 5 Star Caravan Touring Park
  • Boston

  • Boston is a large market town with a depth of character. Situated only a few miles from Long Acres Touring Park, it would be a shame to miss the opportunity to visit this interesting town. St Botolph's church, affectionately known as the Stump is the largest parish church in the country and at the heart of the town. On Wednesdays and Saturdays the marketplace is filled with the regions largest market.

    An eclectic mix of English and European restaurants and cafes mean you will always find choices for somewhere to eat. Shopping is great too, with all the big names you expect from a large town. Exploring the Medieval Lanes, you will find numerous independent shops.

  • Explore Boston further

    There is more to Boston than just the Stump and shopping. The Guildhall is a magnificent Medieval building built in the 1390's. It is now a museum dedicated to the Pilgrim fathers who were imprisoned here before setting sail on the Mayflower. Furthermore, the country's largest working mill, the Maud Foster, is a dominating feature on the landscape. Take a walk along the river bank and explore the marina and Witham Way Country Park. Catching the Boston Belle pleasure boat will give you a relaxed view of the river. why not cycle in using one of our cycle routes.

  • Hanseatic League

    Boston has recently renewed it's Hanseatic links and visitors can follow a "Hanseatic merchants trail". This highlights what remains of Boston's successful trading history. In the 13th century, the port of Boston was second only to London in trade and was the country's leading exporter of wool.
    Hanse boats unloaded their goods at Packhouse Quay in South Street, which has now largely been converted into flats. Custom House stands opposite the quay, with a magnificent coat of arms above the door. Built in 1725 it is one of the oldest Custom Houses in the country. A little further down South Street is the Guildhall and next door to that, is Fydell House. Built in 1702, the house and garden is open to the public.